justincoslor (justincoslor) wrote,
justincoslor
justincoslor

Book 2 of Possibility Thinking Explorations in Logic and Thought

--------------------------------------
This is an unfinished work and I disclaim all liability.
--------------------------------------
------------------------
Book II:
Networks of Questions
------------------------
2/28/98 Everything I know about questions
6/17/2005 Question Networks: option questions v.s. spectrum questions
5/25/2005 Question expectation templates and question context intersections
5/24/2005 Question asking systems
5/10/2005 Re-defining basic question thought forms
5/11/2005 Writing Tips
10/20/2004 Regarding Education
6/1/2005 Choice
5/31/2005 Creativity
5/28/2005 Intuitions
8/13/2005 Ideas and Probabilities

------------------------
Book II:
Networks of Questions
------------------------
=======================
Everything I know about questions.
=======================
By Justin Coslor
justincoslor@gmail.com
(These ideas are all copyright by Justin Coslor on their respective
dates. I very much want to share these ideas, but I may want to work in
collaboration on related projects, so I withhold all intellectual
property rights to this material. The work in this document is just a
small selection of my ideas. Please do not steal my work via Tempest
equipment or by any other means. If you are interested (due to tempest
surveillance since I haven't shown anyone this,) and wish to
collaborate, feel free to contact me at the above email address, and I
will keep your technological secrets as long as you don't exploit me.
Also, I'm egalitarian and I don't build weapons. Let's get that strait.
Realize, I'm living on food stamps and measley disability stipend that
barely pays the rent.) 2/28/98 Standard Inferences About actions: who
what happened why when where how. Most everything else just uses one or
a couple of these inferences. 10/6/2003 Query As far as questions are
concerned... It seems like there are yes/no questions, option questions,
spectrum questions, ind-depth (and short) descriptive questions,
computational questions, essay questions, etc. Some are subjective (of
opinion), some are neutral, some are definitive, some are explanatory,
some are geometrical/visual, some are mathematical, some are of finite
domain, some are impossible, some are biased, some are traps, some are
falsely/inaccurately stated, some are open-ended, some are
meaningless/pointless, some are direct, some are indirect, some are of
infinite domain (a snapshot), some are time/space sensitive, some are
quantitative, some are qualitative, some are recursive. 8/1/2004
Questions (a re-write) Questions can be used to define agendas; or
indicate knowledge; gaps; or inquire about attributes, associations, and
relations; or speculate; or to demonstrate something or make a
statement; or be used for introspection or inspection; or to infer,
deduce, or search for the elements of a pattern or context or its
system(s) or relations; or to map assumptions (an assumption being the
context that defines a set of beliefs); or to analyze and re-analyze
data and information. 3/15/2005 Networks of Questions
In considering ideas and information that is new to me, I ask
networks of questions. The questions can be framed as dependency charts.
Now what is a good way to understand dependency charts? List out the
major nodes (most well-connected nodes) as open-ended definitions, and
form lexicons out of the interconnected definitions. Next map out the
rest of the nodes axiomatically using those definition structures. Turn
this into a software for common sense perception. Maybe make a web
crawler cognition engine that can learn the meaning behind things so
that it can solve problems by figuring out new ways of thinking about
things (adapting the context of question/perception networks). 3/15/2005
Experimentation Sometimes experimentation is necessary to solve problems
and answer questions, because some nodes of information or questions or
contextual perception networks are otherwise unreachable, and often
entirely unknown to exist. 4/15/2005 Question Networks, continued...
Abductive reasoning: When does a function discover or prove an axiom?
What metric makes analogy recognizable? Do recursive lexicons have the
potential for infinite macro-scale growth? Do they have the potential
for infinite micro-scale growth? Or will they all be governed primarily
by the initial categories? Form networks of questions to gain valuable
perspectives on topical and problem data. Model question engines in a
careful evolutionary goal manner with substainability and capability and
necessity as the primary objectives. Map the spectrum of inquiry.
Expectations->Intentions->Experimentation (scientific
combinations)->Dependency Chart Gaps and Representation
Gaps->Formulation of questions incorporating "known" data. 5/4/2005
Answers We're surrounded by answers, but they're all meaningless and
often impossible to even detect without knowing at least some of the
questions that they are derived from. Without this question/answer
connection, there is no consciousness, awareness would not exist.
Copyright 5/10/2005 Justin Coslor Re-defining basic question
thought-forms: Why? = Is there a reason for how this came to be, and
what is it? What? = The existence of this shall be called by a name that
needs to be defined, and we are inquiring about that. When? = This
occurred or shall occur at what time and day? How? = By what process
does this function? Notice that I had to use "what" in every one of
these (except I tried not to use "what" in it's own definition, which
was difficult). Therefore "what" is the most important thought form to
focus on. "What" is the algebraic domain of the relation "that", or
"this", or "these", or "those"; and the range is unknown, and is
entirely unbounded. "That", is a pointer to a specific instance of
something in existence (whether it be in physical or Platonic reality).
The difference between Platonic objects and physical objects is that
Platonic objects are just pointers to other pointers, whereas physical
objects are pointers that point to themselves in a loop. Physical
objects can bound and/or link (like a chain) other physical objects
because if we geometrize the representation of the pointers we have
physics, since the pointers loop. We exist partially in physical
reality, and partially in Platonic reality since we can make conversions
between the two. It's like the difference between particles and waves.
Copyright 6/17/2005 Justin Coslor Question Networks: Option questions
v.s. spectrum questions
A lot of ambiguity is in every question. For instance, if you asked
a question today you'd get one answer most likely, but if you asked that
same question 10,000 years from now you'd probably get a much different
answer. The scope of a question can be narrow or it cana be wide. With a
narrow scope, a question might be a basic question that can be modified
by many options, or it can be a bunch of cases, as in specific
questions. Those are option questions. They lay out perspective question
options.
When the scope is very general or comprehensive of a lot of
possibilities, then it is a spectrum question because it is intended to
explore a range of possibilities that are within the same domain. Option
questions seek to explore multiple questions that are not necessarily of
the same domain. Copyright 5/25/2005 Justin Coslor Question expectation
templates and question context intersections
Questions contain an expectation template of the kind or class of
answers that thet inquisitor is looking for. Often times though, the
answers that are found or generated, or the answers that are of the most
use, do not match the question's expectation template. Often times,
answers that ar suitable cannot be derived or located until the question
is elaborated, generalized, or otherwise modeled using different
representation, such as analogical equivalencies of its objects,
objectives, contexts, and relations.
Every question is the intersection of several contexts, where behind
the scenes, each context has its own unique expectation template; such
as: - 1. The type of question: who, what, where, when, why, how, and its
structure and methods. - 2. The semantic purpose of the question
indicated by the question's structure: to define a context, to define a
pattern or variable property, to state an open-ended knowledge structure
and indicate the unknowns and data access points, to explore a domain or
a range, etc. Or to state facts alongside the question, to indicate
expectation parameters of the answer(s). - 3. The setting of the
question is object(s) and relation(s). Associated objects and relations
can be explicit or implied, but does result in expectation parameters. -
4. The existential time frame or solidity or transitory frame cycle of
the question's objects and relations in regard to their setting is
another context involved in definitive consideration of answer
expectation parameters. - 5. - 6. . . etc. There may be many more
foundational contexts that intersect in the formation and existence of
every question. Copyright 5/24/2005 Justin Coslor Question asking
systems Question -> Perception of meaning of question -> Search and
answer retrieval -> answer formulation -> interpretation of answer. In
short, QUESTION -> ANSWER(S).
The more methods of knowledge representation that are available to
model the perception of the meaning of the question, the more depth and
breadth the search scope will have in the answer retrieval process, and
the experimental data combining buffer will have more possibilities to
form experimental combination answers with. If the answers are
experimental, then they may need to be tested or proven valid. Not all
valid answers are useful though, and not all questions can be modeled
accurately. Question-Answer systems and Question asking systems are
subject to priority systems, in their exploration of patterns in
contexts. Every question or series of questions is a rough draft of the
question that will produce or point to the desired answer that contains
the right level of detail of suitable content. Copyright 5/10/2005
Justin Coslor Re-defining basic question thought-forms: Why? = Is there
a reason for how this came to be, and what is it? What? = The existence
of this shall be called by a name that needs to be defined, and we are
inquiring about that. When? = This occurred or shall occur at what time
and day? How? = By what process does this function? Notice that I had to
use "what" in every one of these (except I tried not to use "what" in
it's own definition, which was difficult). Therefore "what" is the most
important thought form to focus on. "What" is the algebraic domain of
the relation "that", or "this", or "these", or "those"; and the range is
unknown, and is entirely unbounded. "That", is a pointer to a specific
instance of something in existence (whether it be in physical or
Platonic reality). The difference between Platonic objects and physical
objects is that Platonic objects are just pointers to other pointers,
whereas physical objects are pointers that point to themselves in a
loop. Physical objects can bound and/or link (like a chain) other
physical objects because if we geometrize the representation of the
pointers we have physics, since the pointers loop. We exist partially in
physical reality, and partially in Platonic reality since we can make
conversions between the two. It's like the difference between particles
and waves... Copyright 5/11/2005 Justin Coslor Writing Tips
When I want to write, to figure out what to write I try to figure
out a priority system, where I aim to invent the most important new idea
that I'm either interested in (topically) or that is very important but
that is only interesting enough to write down for somebody else to
explore. Once I've focused on a topic I start asking questions and map
it out and associate it to other areas and build networks of questions
and answers and arbitrary data.
I have to feel like writing and be relaxed and well hydrated
(slightly caffeinated helps), and it's best when I'm thinking at my best
(not bogged down by emotions) I don't consider this entry an "idea"
since I feel awful and am terribly lonely and depressed and have
heartburn at the moment. I write best when I'm either really really
happy (a bipolar high), or really really depressed (a bipolar low).
10/20/2004 Justin Coslor Regarding Education
If people could be taught first how to learn on their own, and next
how to find and update their sources of information and resources, and
then be taught creative and consistent logic and how to interact in
their chosen forums of discourse, along with some skills as to how they
can negotiate their insights and nurtured talents for wellbeing and
non-harmful prosperity to an extent limited to what they can
successfully and comfortably manage without bloating into the arena of
greed or ill- intent; then they would have a great potential for doing a
lot of good in the world and in the happiness of their daily lives.
Lives lived purposefully. 10/28/2004 Justin Coslor It's important to be
semi-autonomous rather than being just another domino. Copyright
6/1/2005 Justin Coslor Choice
Choice depends on having recognized options to choose from. The
availability of options depends on a system of awareness, and the
explorative mapping of solution spaces and/or experimentally created
generation. Also an evaluation system or metric is necessary for the
selection process to pick a suitable option. The initiation of choice
can be voluntary or forced; and it can be activated out of necessity, or
independently. Copyright 5/31/2005 Justin Coslor Creativity
Creative processes start out with a chosen medium, and then a random
process is activated that generates a lot of possibilities, then it is a
matter of choosing the best or most desirable possibilities and
elaborating on them and linking them. That is what creativity means to
me. The creator may also have several goals or requirements in mind, and
be aware of juggling prerequisites. Copyright 5/28/2005 Justin Coslor
Intuitions
Intuitions are sequences of inspiration, and are part possibility
thinking, part logical thinking, and part random chance phenomenon.
Intuitive truth requires proof. Copyright 8/13/2005 Justin Coslor Ideas
and Probabilities
Ideas change probabilities, and ideas come from experimentation:
search, sort, and shuffle (grouping and storing patterns in contexts).
Ideas guide courses of action and affect expectations, of which
reactions are based on, and those are some of the probabilities ideas
can change, but they can also pave the way for new systems and
developments.
Intentions guide experimentation, and logic guides methodology.
Axioms define logic and modes of proof. Innate programming (instinct)
and use of methodology in real-time guides intentions.
Useful ideas change contexts dramatically, and in doing so, many of
the patterns in those contexts are able to form lots of new associations
and possibilities. The most sweeping ideas are at the axiom level, and
as new axioms are added, contexts expand and develop greater depth and
greater interconnectivity.
--------------------------------------
This is an unfinished work and I disclaim all liability.
--------------------------------------
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Comments allowed for friends only

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

  • 0 comments